Japan scientists can 'read' dreams

 

Scientists in Japan said they had found a way to "read" people's dreams, using MRI scanners to unlock some of the secrets of the unconscious mind.

Researchers have managed what they said was "the world's first decoding" of night-time visions, the subject of centuries of speculation that have captivated humanity since ancient times.

In the study, published in the journal Science, scientists at the ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories, in Kyoto, western Japan, used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans to locate exactly which part of the brain was active during the first moments of sleep.

They then woke up the dreamer and asked him or her what images they had seen, a process that was repeated 200 times.

These answers were compared with the brain maps that had been produced by the MRI scanner.

Researchers were then able to predict what images the volunteers had seen with a 60 percent accuracy rate, rising to more than 70 percent with around 15 specific items including men, words and books, they said.

"We have concluded that we successfully decoded some kinds of dreams with a distinctively high success rate," said Yukiyasu Kamitani, a senior researcher at the laboratories and head of the study team.

"I believe it was a key step towards reading dreams more precisely," Kamitani told AFP.

 

AFP, photo by adam_erlebacher

140-million-year-old dinosaur tooth found in Malaysia PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 13 November 2014 22:47

 

A dinosaur tooth found in Malaysia is at least 140 million years old and belongs to a new species within the "bird-hipped" Ornithischian order, researchers said Thursday.

While still unsure of the exact species of dinosaur, lead researcher Masatoshi Sone from the University of Malaya said the discovery means "it is plausible that large dinosaur fossil deposits still remain in Malaysia".

"We started the programme to look for dinosaur fossils two years ago. We are very excited to have found the tooth of the dinosaurian order called Ornithischian in central Pahang state" last year, he said.

Researchers from Japan's Waseda University and Kumamoto University also took part in the project.

Ornithischian, or "bird-hipped", is a major group comprised of herbivous dinosaurs such as triceratops.

The dinosaur would have been about as big as a horse, Sone said.

 

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 November 2014 22:50
 
F1 champion Hamilton ready for new title fight PDF Print E-mail
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Wednesday, 26 November 2014 14:16

 

 

Two-time world champion Lewis Hamilton said Monday he is determined to keep winning Formula One titles after his triumph in Abu Dhabi.

After a night of partying following Sunday's Grand Prix victory, the 29-year-old Briton said he would get immediately down to work improving the car for next season.

"We want to be able to go into next season and compete again and be as strong as possible.

"That's obviously going to be the goal and I have absolute faith in the team that we will come back very, very strong next year."

Hamilton's victory, after Mercedes teammate and season long rival Nico Rosberg made a poor start from pole position and then suffered mechanical problems on his way to finishing 14th, added a second title to the first won in 2008.

 

Mercedes dominated the season with a record 16 wins in 19 races – 11 to Hamilton and five to Rosberg – and produced speed and consistency that left their rivals stranded.

The team now appear poised to enjoy an era of supremacy like that of Germans Michael Schumacher, at Ferrari, and Sebastian Vettel, at Red Bull.

"The first title was an exceptional and an incredible feeling for me,” said Hamilton.

"That was achieving a life-long goal of getting to Formula One and winning the world championship. I don't know if I was in a place to really embrace it and absorb it in the way I can today.

"Being a part of this team is definitely a more satisfying feeling. Winning this championship with this team -- a young team that has worked so hard to get to where we are," he added.

"To be a part of that is something really very special.

"You see the atmosphere in the team, you see the guys at the factory and what's gone on with the partnership with Petronas and all the guys back at the factories in Brackley and Brixworth putting the team together.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 26 November 2014 14:27
 
London heads extensive house value lull PDF Print E-mail
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Wednesday, 26 November 2014 17:04

 

More confirmation has risen that proposes London house value development is situated to abate strongly while the national business sector moderates.

Of the UK's 20 biggest urban communities, 14 are presently enlisting house value in­fla­tion beneath the national normal for the UK, as per information discharged today by property market investigators Hometrack.

In the course of recent months, London has seen the greatest addition – 17.3 for every penny. In any case, an alternate set of information discharged today recommends the London business sector is moderating after a year of blast. In London the extent of families reporting that the estimation of their property climbed in November was 62.7 for every penny, down from 73.3 for every penny a month ago, as indicated by domain specialists Knight Frank and money related data firm Markit.

A house value slant file delivered by Markit kept on intimating development was moderating.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 26 November 2014 17:07
 
Scientists sound alarm over ocean acidification PDF Print E-mail
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Wednesday, 08 October 2014 20:41

 

 

Ocean acidification has risen by a quarter since pre-industrial times as a result of rising carbon emissions, casting a shadow over the seas as a future source of food, scientists warned on Wednesday.

In the past two centuries, the sea's acidity level has risen 26 percent, mirroring the proportion of carbon dioxide it absorbs from the air, they said in a report to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) meeting in South Korea.

Rising acidity will have damaging consequences for shellfish, corals and other calcium-making organisms which play a vital part in the food web, they said.

"It is now nearly inevitable that within 50 to 100 years, continued anthropogenic [man-made] carbon dioxide emissions will further increase ocean acidity to levels that will have widespread impacts... on marine organisms and ecosystems and the goods and services they provide," they said.

Acidification may already be affecting shellfish farms in the northwestern United States, they said.

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 08 October 2014 20:45
 
London named Best City for Culture PDF Print E-mail
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Wednesday, 22 October 2014 15:30

 

 

London was the huge champ as Leading Culture Destinations reported the champs of its inaugural yearly recompenses.

The capital was named as Best City for Culture, and the Tate Modern gathered three recompenses, Leading Culture Destination 2014, and for Exhibitions & Programming, and Digital Experience.

It was the first and final worldwide recompenses to commend the best not-for-benefit visual expressions establishments around the world.cultural foundations in urban areas as far and wide as Paris, New York, Miami, Shanghai, Oslo, Berlin and Mexico City, were among those contending to win nine grants at the occasion, held at Jumeirah Carlton Tower, London.

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 26 October 2014 19:35
 
'Miracle' Chinese panda triplets celebrate 100-day milestone PDF Print E-mail
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Thursday, 06 November 2014 14:39

 

 

A set of panda triplets, the world's only known surviving trio, celebrated reaching their 100-day milestone in a Chinese zoo Wednesday as the public were allowed to visit them for the first time.

Their births at the end of July were hailed as a "miracle", given the animal's famously low reproductive rate, and fears that they may not survive have been quelled.

A video from Guangzhou's Chimelong Safari Park showed the three cubs sprawled on their fronts on a blanket in a small enclosure, nudging each other with their snouts and lying back yawning.

The two male and one female cubs, which first opened their eyes in September, now weigh six kilograms (13 pounds) each, the zoo said.

Visitors to their glass enclosure will be limited to 1,000 a day.

The celebration video traced the triplets' lives so far and portrayed the two young male cubs as looking up to their sister.

"Our older sister 'Long Long' leads us, and we are happy," the birthday song said.

The animals have not yet been officially named but will be soon, according to the zoo.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 06 November 2014 14:44
 
Labour 'could offer London's QEII Conference Center' PDF Print E-mail
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Monday, 24 November 2014 09:45

 

 

The QEII Conference Center and the Civil Service Club are among four focal London structures that could be sold off by a future Labor government to help pay off the deficiency.

Labour says the properties claimed by government offices may be "unimportant" and could raise £100m.

An audit is additionally inspecting different resources, policing and nearby government.

Labour says it would work to lessen the UK's £67bn shortage in a "more pleasant manner" than the Conservatives.

The gathering is to commission esteem for-cash audits of the four structures to consider whether it would be more proper for them to be sold.

Labour says the QEII Conference Center inverse Westminster Abbey, is evaluated to be worth more than £25m, while the close-by Civil Service Club could get £6.8m.

Opened in 1986, the QEII Conference Center is the biggest venue of its kind in focal London. It has played host to summits, organization Agms, the BBC Sports Personality of the Year, the Iraq Inquiry, and opening knowing about the Princess Diana examination.

 

Last Updated on Monday, 24 November 2014 09:50
 
Norwegian prodigy Carlsen retains World Chess championship PDF Print E-mail
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Tuesday, 25 November 2014 16:11

 

Norwegian prodigy Magnus Carlsen retained his title as World Chess Champion on Sunday, defeating rival Viswanathan Anand for the second year in a row.

The 23-year-old world number one beat India's Anand, title-holder of the championship from 2007 to 2013 when he was dethroned by Carlsen, in two of 11 games of the competition, with the others ending in draws.

"I am very happy," Carlsen was quoted as saying by Russian press agency TASS. "It was a very difficult match, much more difficult than last year."

"Anand is a very strong chess player, but he had practically no chance of winning."

Carlsen had been playing since November 8 against Anand, who is nearly 20 years his senior, in the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi.

The victory, secured with a difference of just two points, will mean one million euros ($1.2 million) in prize money for Carlsen just a week before his 24th birthday.

"Overall, throughout the match, Carlsen played better than I did," Anand was quoted as saying by TASS.

"I tried, but the risk didn't work out. Carlsen didn't make a mistake. I had nothing left to do but take risks."

Carlsen turned grandmaster at 13 and in 2010, aged only 19, became the youngest player in history to be ranked world number one. He won the Candidates Tournament in 2013 to earn the right to challenge Anand.

His breakthrough in chess came in 2004, when as a 13-year-old he defeated Russian former world champion Anatoly Karpov, forced Russian legend Garry Kasparov to a draw, and became a grandmaster.

Before Carlsen captured the championship crown in 2013, the last Westerner to hold the title was American legend Bobby Fischer who relinquished it in 1975.

Carlsen missed by a few weeks becoming the youngest world champion, a record set by his one-time coach Kasparov in 1985.

 

 

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 25 November 2014 16:17
 
Sainsbury’s Nine Elms donates items for Herbert Morrison Primary School coffee morning PDF Print E-mail
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Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:01

 

 

On Friday 26th September, Herbert Morrison’s Primary School held a coffee morning for Macmillan, with ingredients kindly donated by Sainsbury’s. Colleagues from the Nine Elms store Andy Robins, Anton Blair and Mohammed Abdul donated cakes, napkins, milk and coffee to the school.

Vanessa Bennett, a teacher from the school paid the store a visit with a few pupils to pick up the donations from the store colleagues, and thank them for their kind donation.

Vanessa said: ‘’Our Macmillan coffee morning was a great success, the cakes and coffee donated by Sainsburys Nine Elms were a real treat. All proceeds will go towards supporting Macmillan.’’

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:09
 
Social networks make push as shopping destinations PDF Print E-mail
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Sunday, 05 October 2014 19:13

 

They're not just for sharing any more: Facebook and Twitter are now looking to play a bigger role in shopping.

Both major social networks have unveiled plans to start using "buy" buttons on their sites, which could start having an impact on "social shopping" in the coming holiday season.

The idea of using social networks such as Facebook to promote e-commerce has been around for some time, but so far has failed to deliver much. Facebook had some short-lived programs for "digital gifts" and another program selling virtual goods via Facebook games.

"Social commerce," stemming from reviews or referrals from social networks, is expected to hit $15 billion by 2015, according to the research firm Invesp.

Some analysts see a natural connection between social networks and shopping, since users often discuss products and brands in the messages.

"Sharing is a fairly reliable indicator of what people are going to buy," says Andy Stevens, head of strategy and research for Share This, a company which produces a sharing button for websites and analyzes social media trends.

 

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 26 October 2014 20:00
 
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