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Tooting & Balham Sea Cadets Raised over £1300 Bag packing at Sainsbury’s Nine Elms Point
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 05 October 2016 15:47

Customers at Sainsbury’s Nine Elms had a helping hand at the till by a local cause. Volunteers from Tooting & Balham Sea Cadets were providing a bag-packing service for customers on Saturday 1st and Sunday 2nd October 2016, to raise money for a new gallery that will allow the cadets to gain more catering qualification within the unit and for the juniors to gain modules.

The Tooting & Balham Sea Cadets , situated in Mellison Road have been supported by Sainsbury’s Nine Elms Point for years. The store have supported the Tooting & Balham Sea Cadets so far by allowing the charity to have awareness stands, collections days and bag packing in store.

Jessica Burton from Tooting & Balham Sea Cadets who was taking part in the bag-packing said: “We was really looking forward to helping pack checkout customer’s shopping and now we would like to take the opportunity to thank Sainsbury’s for their support and helping to raise awareness of our Tooting & Balham Sea Cadets.”

 
Weapons used in Aleppo are devastating for civilians
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 28 September 2016 09:33

 

Syrian and Russian air strikes on Aleppo have prompted accusations of war crimes over claims they involve sophisticated weaponry that can have a devastating effect in residential areas.

It is not clear exactly what armaments have been deployed but UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon cited reports of incendiary weapons and bunker buster bombs, while barrel bombs and cluster munitions have also been used previously in Syria.

Which weapons might have been used?

- Bunker busters: named for their use in penetrating hardened targets such as underground military headquarters.

- Incendiary weapons: used to start fires, including materials such as napalm and white phosphorous, which can cause severe burns if they come into contact with skin.

They have a legitimate function of generating smokescreens.

 

 
5,500 UK-based finance firms could lose EU 'passporting' rights: regulator
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 22 September 2016 20:56

 

The 'passport' rights allowing 5,500 British-based financial firms to operate freely across the European single market are at stake in the fallout from Brexit, posing a 'significant' risk to the finance sector, the country's financial watchdog has revealed.

Some 8,000 financial firms based elsewhere in the European Union also do business in Britain via passporting, and their rights are likewise threatened, data from the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) regulator showed.

The passport scheme allows companies to do business across the 28-nation European Union -- and the 31-strong European Economic Area which includes Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.

In the run-up to Britain's EU exit referendum in June, major players in the City of London finance district warned about the impact of a possible departure from the EU single market -- and the loss of passporting.

The future of those rights is uncertain ahead of the expected start of Brexit negotiations next year to draw up a formal new trade deal with the EU.

"These figures give us an initial idea of the effects of losing full access to the single market in financial services," said lawmaker Andrew Tyrie, who heads parliament's Treasury Select Committee (TSC).

 
UK slams Hungary leaflet with London as 'no-go' zone
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 21 September 2016 20:46

Britain has criticised Hungary's government for a leaflet being distributed there ahead of its referendum on EU migrant quotas which indicates parts of Britain as "no-go areas" due to high numbers of immigrants.

The no-go zones map of Europe came out as a newspaper ad in Hungary several months ago. It has now been included in the 18-page pamphlet posted to millions of people ahead of the referendum next month.

"This leaflet is clearly inaccurate. There are no areas in the UK in which the laws of the UK cannot be enforced," Britain's Foreign and Commonwealth Office said in a statement.

The British embassy in Budapest has complained to the Hungarian foreign ministry about the publication.

 

 
Britain approves Hinkley Point nuclear deal
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 15 September 2016 20:43

 

Britain finally gave the go-ahead Thursday for Hinkley Point, its first nuclear plant in a generation, but set conditions to address concerns over China's role in a flagship project for Europe's nuclear sector.

The announcement, welcomed by its French and Chinese backers, came two months after Prime Minister Theresa May caused shockwaves by ordering a review of the £18 billion (21 billion euro, $24 billion) deal brokered under her predecessor, David Cameron.

China has a one-third stake in the project and analysts had warned that Britain could have jeopardised relations with the world's second-largest economy if it scrapped the deal while critics said it could give China the power to turn off the lights.

Jean-Bernard Levy, chief executive of the French state-owned power company EDF, said the move "relaunches nuclear power in Europe".

EDF's board had already approved its participation in the project in southwest England in July when May's government suddenly announced it was pausing it.

 

 
Suu Kyi, May discuss human rights
Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 14 September 2016 17:55

 

Aung San Suu Kyi on Tuesday met with British Prime Minister Theresa May during her first visit to London since becoming Myanmar’s de facto leader, with the thorny issue of human rights on the agenda.

The two women discussed the challenges faced by Myanmar as it transitions from military rule to democracy during Suu Kyi’s first visit outside of Asia since her party’s election victory last year.

“They agreed that to create a society that truly works for all, it would be important to see Burma [Myanmar] make further progress in the creation of jobs, in improving access to quality healthcare, and on reforming the education system,” said May’s Downing Street office.

 
UK Faces Free Trade Headache
Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 13 September 2016 09:50

 

 

Britain’s desire to become a free trade leader following its vote to leave the European Union is seen as wishful thinking by experts, who say London’s hands are tied until a formal exit from the bloc.

Prime Minister Theresa May used this month’s G20 summit in China to explore potential trade deals with Australia, India, Mexico, Singapore and South Korea.

But international trade experts have been quick to highlight Britain’s lack of experience in such negotiations.

“Currently, legally speaking, the UK is part of the EU and therefore is not able to conclude free trade agreements,” said Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, director of trade policy think tank, the European Centre for International Political Economy.

“For me, it is more an experience problem because the UK has actually not negotiated” on such matters since 1973 when the country joined the European Union, Mr. Lee-Makiyama added.

At stake is Britain’s position as a major world economy along with its future economic and employment growth.

 
Britain faces free trade headache after Brexit vote
Written by Administrator   
Sunday, 11 September 2016 14:56

 

Britain’s desire to become a free trade leader following its vote to leave the EU is seen as wishful thinking by experts, who say London’s hands are tied until a formal exit from the bloc.

Prime Minister Theresa May used this month’s G20 summit in China to explore potential trade deals with Australia, India, Mexico, Singapore and South Korea.

But international trade experts have been quick to highlight Britain’s lack of experience in such negotiations.

"Currently, legally speaking, the UK is part of the EU and therefore is not able to conclude free trade agreements," said Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, director of trade policy think tank, the European Centre for International Political Economy.

"For me, it is more an experience problem because the UK has actually not negotiated" on such matters since 1973 when the country joined the European Union, Lee-Makiyama added.

 
London mayor defends famed club Fabric's closure over drugs
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 08 September 2016 15:07

 

London's mayor threw his support behind DJs and ravers on Wednesday by criticising the closure of the city's famed Fabric nightclub, after its licence was revoked following several drug-related deaths.

The local council revoked Fabric's license after an initial suspension last month at the request of police, following the deaths of two teenagers from suspected drug overdoses at the nightspot in the borough of Islington.

Khan described Fabric as an "essential part of our cultural landscape" and expressed his disappointment that the club owners, local authorities and the police were unable to reach an agreement.

Fabric, renowned for its drum and bass, techno and house nights, built up a reputation to rival fellow British clubbing institution Ministry of Sound over the last decade and a half.

"The issues faced by Fabric point to a wider problem of how we protect London's night-time economy, while ensuring it is safe and enjoyable for everyone," he said in a statement.

 

 
London stocks drop on strong pound
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 05 September 2016 19:44

 

London's stock market fell Monday on a rallying pound, while eurozone indices lost earlier gains to close flat after a pre-weekend surge triggered by well-received US jobs data.

Wall Street was closed for a public holiday.

Oil prices bounced after the world's two biggest oil producers, Saudi Arabia and Russia, pledged to stabilise the market.

London's benchmark FTSE 100 index was 0.2 percent lower, as the pound jumped above $1.33 in the wake of strong UK services sector activity that further eased concerns over Brexit's economic fallout.

"August saw the UK economy score a hat-trick of good news with a record rebound in the services PMI to round things off after solid readings for the manufacturing and construction sectors," said Forex.com analyst Fawad Razaqzada.

"This is really good news for the pound, perhaps not so good for UK stocks in the short-term as it reduces the odds for further rate cuts from the Bank of England."

Activity in Britain's crucial services sector showed a record jump in August, rebounding strongly from a slump immediately following the country's vote to exit the EU, according to a survey.

 

 
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